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Question:


I am cleaning and restoring the logs on an old Adirondack camp. The existing chinking is rope. I am not sure, but I beleive it to be either a Hemp rope or a horsehair rope. The owner would like to install new rope chinking on the walls that are weathered , keeping the walls that are protected "as is" (rope is in good shape on those walls} Any ideas on what may have been used originally? (1920's) and what I might be able to use today that would closely resemble rope chinking?

Answer:

It is called Oakum and was used for chinking for many years. Call Timeless Wood Care Products to purchase at 800-564-2987.

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Posted By Richard McGarry
9/24/2013
Check some boat building books to see different caulking processes used in old school building. Hemp or oakum soaked in linseed oil and finally filled and sealed with a seam filler. My bet is there is a good caulk in a caulking tube that would be better than the old stuff. We have made transformational progress in both adhesives and sealants as seen on TV. Sealmate in clear, blac and white. Spray on product. Logic must be considered in the caulking process regarding adhesion of product, expansion in hot and cold seasonal climates. Surely logs expand and contract due to heat, cold and humidity just as in boats. Always experiment on a small area and take closeup photos and make observational notes on environmental conditions, is. temps, percipatation and humidity.
Posted By Richard McGarry
9/28/2013
Check some boat building books to see different caulking processes used in old school building. Hemp or oakum soaked in linseed oil and finally filled and sealed with a seam filler. My bet is there is a good caulk in a caulking tube that would be better than the old stuff. We have made transformational progress in both adhesives and sealants as seen on TV. Sealmate in clear, blac and white. Spray on product. Logic must be considered in the caulking process regarding adhesion of product, expansion in hot and cold seasonal climates. Surely logs expand and contract due to heat, cold and humidity just as in boats. Always experiment on a small area and take closeup photos and make observational notes on environmental conditions, is. temps, percipatation and humidity.